ardent

Aug 29

elbowintherim:

sinclairsolutions:

This is the exact moment I fell in love with Breaking Bad.


This scene man

elbowintherim:

sinclairsolutions:

This is the exact moment I fell in love with Breaking Bad.

This scene man

(via thekeifchief)

haydenwilliamsillustrations:

Disney Divas ‘Princess vs Villainess’ by Hayden Williams: Snow White & The Evil Queen

haydenwilliamsillustrations:

Disney Divas ‘Princess vs Villainess’ by Hayden Williams: Snow White & The Evil Queen

Aug 28

8bit-ghost:


beatngu:

Def doesn’t look like the picture on the box…

I THOUGHT SOMEONE JIZZED INTO THAT WAFFLE

8bit-ghost:

beatngu:

Def doesn’t look like the picture on the box…

I THOUGHT SOMEONE JIZZED INTO THAT WAFFLE

(via kaijukilla)

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

(via thekeifchief)

shotgunheart:

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

dewgonair:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital
it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

Please, please, PLEASE, reblog this. i don’t know if I did save or called false alarm, with my boss’ life tonight. I felt I was being a bit paranoid, overreacting, but I told Mirage my thoughts and he, after reading over the article I showed him, immediately sprung into action and then shooed her off to the hospital. I don’t know if I did or not, but I knew she’d been super stressed. She’d off-handedly commented on her arm tingling and I asked her if she felt queasy on a hunch. I went to look at the symptoms and we went from there.

Important

I get really frustrated at this post. It’s important information and dfab people need to be aware of how their symptoms can differ, but it’s EXTREMELY brief on info. WHY are symptoms different? Is it hormones, bone structure, fat distribution, or genealogy based? Does breast size factor in? Existence of a uterus or ovaries?
All of these questions are valid for cis women but also extremely important for intersex individuals and trans women, and possibly even trans men.
I have no idea what symptoms to look for once I start hormones. None. Because the cissexism of “oh these are women’s symptoms” means there’s no research on this. (I looked.)And trans women already have a higher risk of heart complications!
How does this impact dmab people with naturally high estrogen? What about dfab people with PCOS?
What I did learn:The lesser pain (instead of the crushing pain usually associated with heart attacks) is from blockages in minor arteries supplying the heart, sometimes called microvascular disease. [1]Metabolic syndrome — a combination of fat around your abdomen, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high triglycerides — has a greater impact on cis women than on cis men. [1]Low levels of estrogen after menopause pose a significant risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease in the smaller blood vessels (microvascular disease). [1]
Do not throw intersex and transgender people under the bus, even when spreading important information. Acknowledge us.
Source(s): [1]

shotgunheart:

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

dewgonair:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital

it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

Please, please, PLEASE, reblog this. i don’t know if I did save or called false alarm, with my boss’ life tonight. I felt I was being a bit paranoid, overreacting, but I told Mirage my thoughts and he, after reading over the article I showed him, immediately sprung into action and then shooed her off to the hospital. I don’t know if I did or not, but I knew she’d been super stressed. She’d off-handedly commented on her arm tingling and I asked her if she felt queasy on a hunch. I went to look at the symptoms and we went from there.

Important

I get really frustrated at this post. It’s important information and dfab people need to be aware of how their symptoms can differ, but it’s EXTREMELY brief on info. WHY are symptoms different? Is it hormones, bone structure, fat distribution, or genealogy based? Does breast size factor in? Existence of a uterus or ovaries?

All of these questions are valid for cis women but also extremely important for intersex individuals and trans women, and possibly even trans men.

I have no idea what symptoms to look for once I start hormones. None. Because the cissexism of “oh these are women’s symptoms” means there’s no research on this. (I looked.)
And trans women already have a higher risk of heart complications!

How does this impact dmab people with naturally high estrogen? What about dfab people with PCOS?

What I did learn:
The lesser pain (instead of the crushing pain usually associated with heart attacks) is from blockages in minor arteries supplying the heart, sometimes called microvascular disease. [1]
Metabolic syndrome — a combination of fat around your abdomen, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high triglycerides — has a greater impact on cis women than on cis men. [1]
Low levels of estrogen after menopause pose a significant risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease in the smaller blood vessels (microvascular disease). [1]

Do not throw intersex and transgender people under the bus, even when spreading important information. Acknowledge us.

Source(s): [1]

(via peppersongg)

[video]

[video]

[video]

Aug 25

(Source: laesquinalatina)

pleatedjeans:

via

pleatedjeans:

via

(via dabhabit)

[video]

Aug 22

[video]

[video]

pajamaben:

ishemilynowhush:

pajamaben:

Hangin’ wit muh girls

Great photo shop

It’s real idiot

pajamaben:

ishemilynowhush:

pajamaben:

Hangin’ wit muh girls

Great photo shop

It’s real idiot

(via frohnksaladbar)

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.